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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 58-62

Microbial isolates from stroke patients with urinary tract infection, at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital


1 Department of Medicine, College of Medical Sciences, University of Benin; Department of Medicine, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria
2 Department of Medical Microbiology, College of Medical Sciences, University of Benin; Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Francis Ehidiamen Odiase
Department of Medicine, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City; Department of Medicine, College of Medical Sciences, University of Benin, Benin City
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/phmj.phmj_1_20

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Background: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common nosocomial infection amongst stroke patients. It is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Despite the impact of UTI on stroke, there is a dearth of knowledge regarding the microbial isolates from the urine of stroke patients with UTI in Nigeria. Aim: The aim of this study was to compile and describe microorganisms causing UTI in stroke patients and it is hoped to provide insight into management. Methods: This was a retrospective study, which involved review of the laboratory microbiology records of urine specimens of stroke patients with UTI who were on admission from June 2004 to June 2018 at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital. Results: A total of 2,681 stroke patients had their urine sent for microbiological assessment of which 778 (29%) had UTI. The mean age of the stroke patients with UTI was 65.9 ± 11.4 years, with 53.0% of them being female, while 69.0% had an ischemic stroke. With regard to the urine microbial isolates, Enterococcus faecalis accounted for 30.0%, Escherichia coli 19.0%, Enterobacter sakazaki and Proteus mirabilis 16.0% each, while Citrobacter freundii(0.8%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (1.1%) were the least isolated microorganism. Conclusion: Stroke patients are at risk of developing catheter-associated UTI. Catheter-associated UTI predisposes to multidrug-resistant antibiotic isolates, attendant with poor outcome. It is hoped that rational use of antibiotics and appropriate urinary catheter application be ensured in the care of the stroke patients.


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