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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 73-77

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Knowledge, attitude and perception among medical students in a private institution in Ogun State, Nigeria


1 Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Benjamin Carson (Snr) School of Medicine, Babcock University, Illisan-Remo, Nigeria
2 Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, College of Health Sciences, University of Abuja, Abuja, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Tinuade Adesola Ajani
Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology Benjamin Carson (Snr) School of Medicine, Babcock University, Illisan-Remo
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/phmj.phmj_8_20

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Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) spread is of concern in the hospital and community. Clinical medical students can serve as vectors for the transmission of the pathogen. This study was aimed to determine the level of knowledge, attitude and perception of MRSA among clinical medical students in Babcock University, Ilishan-Remo, Ogun State, Nigeria. Methods: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study that involved 100 clinical medical students in Babcock University from March 2018 to March 2019. A structured self-administered questionnaire was used to assess the knowledge, attitude and perception of MRSA among the participants. Data were analysed using IBM SPSS version 23. The mean ± standard deviation (SD) of the correct answers to knowledge, attitude and perception of MRSA was analysed, respectively. Respondents who scored more than the mean ± SD were considered to have adequate knowledge, attitude and perception. Results: Majority (59%) had respectively poor knowledge, attitude (51%) and perception (51%) about MRSA. Among the 41% who have heard about MRSA, 30/41 (73.2%) had their source of information from classroom lectures. Fifty-seven per cent of the participants did not know the drug of choice for MRSA, whereas 32% were not sure of the importance of handwashing in the prevention of MRSA. Good knowledge and perception were significantly associated with clinical year of study (P < 0.05), whereas good knowledge was significantly associated with marital status (P = 0.029) and clinical year of study (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The level of knowledge, attitude and perception of the study participants to MRSA was inadequate.


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