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CASE REPORT
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 38-41

Non-blood management of severe anaemia in pregnant human immunodeficiency virus positive Jehovah's Witness patients in the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt, Nigeria


1 Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria
2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaeocology, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
E E Igbigbi
Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, PMB 6173, Port Harcourt, Rivers State
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/phmj.phmj_12_17

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Background: Blood transfusion is clinically used to treat severe anaemia, but some people refuse it for its adverse effects and religious reasons. Aim: To present two Jehovah's Witness pregnant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive women who were managed successfully without blood at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital. Methods: Case series - The first case, a 27-year-old Jehovah's Witness woman was found to be retropositive with severe anaemia. She had a packed cell volume (PCV) of 14% in her second trimester in pregnancy. She was treated with oral haematinics, and the PCV rose to 34% before an elective caesarean section. The second case was a 29-year-old Jehovah's Witness woman who was admitted for chronic cough and fever in her second trimester. On further investigation, she was found to have pulmonary tuberculosis, septicaemia and severe anaemia with a PCV of 17%. She declined blood transfusion and was managed with parenteral iron and erythropoietin. Both cases had safe deliveries with good fetomaternal outcome. Conclusion: Pregnant patients who decline blood transfusion can be adequately managed if they register in the first trimester or the early second trimester and such cases need good team management and cooperation between the patient and the teams for a good outcome.


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